FRC Blog

Bible Belt Refuses to Buckle under on Religious Courses

by Tony Perkins

April 5, 2007

A Texas legislator, Rep. Warren Chisum (R), has introduced a bill that would require schools to offer history and literacy classes on the Bible. The proposal, now under debate in the House Public Education Committee, would affect over 1,700 districts throughout the state. If it passes, Texas would join several other states in offering elective courses on the most widely distributed book in the world.

Although some are criticizing the move as a violation of church and state, the bill’s sponsor said, “We’re not going to preach the Bible, we’re going to teach the Bible.” Proving that the Good Book is experiencing an educational revival, five other states are considering similar proposals.

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D.C. Loses One, Gains One

by Tony Perkins

April 5, 2007

At FRC headquarters last night, we formally welcomed Ken Blackwell to the staff as Senior Fellow for Family Empowerment at an evening reception attended by many of our allies and friends in the nation’s capital. To a standing-room-only crowd, Ken delivered remarks on the current political landscape and the lessons learned from the 2006 elections. We look forward to showcasing his insight and expertise on issues such as family economics, tax reform, and education.

While a new hero is entering Washington, we honor another who is departing. Jan LaRue, a former FRC colleague, is retiring from her position as Chief Counsel and Legal Studies Director at Concerned Women for America and moving to Texas. Jan has taken a lead role nationwide on issues like pornography, abortion, and judicial activism. Although she will be greatly missed, her efforts in the nation’s capital live on through the many people her work and testimony have touched. Please join us in thanking Jan for her dedication to the cause!

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Trying to get something from nothing

by Family Research Council

April 4, 2007

Q: Why are there so few Buddhist rhythm and blues bands?

A: Because Buddhists don’t have any soul.

Some Evangelicals are doing some unusual, but interesting, outreach.

Evangelicals hope to ‘reach’ Buddhists

Workshops coincide with Dalai Lama visit

If you’re a Tibetan Buddhist or you’re leaning that way, you may not know it, but you need Jesus.

That’s the thinking behind a series of Christian evangelical workshops — including one later this month in Wheaton — that will coincide with the Dalai Lama’s trip to Chicago and other American cities this spring.

The Dalai Lama is set to visit Chicago in May. A Philadelphia-based Christian missionary group is holding a series of workshops on how to share the gospel with Tibetan Buddhists.

Interserve USA is putting on the workshops to teach Christians how to talk to Buddhists and, perhaps, to win converts. More …

And in case I havent offended Richard Gere yet:

Q: Why don’t Buddhists vacuum in the corners?

A: Because they have no attachments.

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Family Facts #10

by Family Research Council

April 4, 2007

Among a sample of adolescent virgins, those living at home with two parents were roughly 38% less likely to engage in sexual activity for the first time during the following year when compared to adolescents not living at home with two parents.

Source: “Friends religiosity and first sex.” Adamczyk, A., Felson, J.

Social Science Research Vol. in press, Number . , 2006. Page(s) NA.

(HT: FamilyFacts.org)

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Welcome (back) to Carousel

by Family Research Council

April 4, 2007

Is it irony that the only people who would get excited by this news are well over thirty?

Matrix’ producer plans remake of sci-fi classic

US filmmaker Joel Silver, who produced all of “The Matrix” films, said Tuesday he is planning a remake of the 1976 Oscar-winning science fiction classic “Logan’s Run.”

I love the original material but I think that version is a bit silly,” he told reporters in Barcelona where he was promoting his latest film “The Reaping” starring Academy Award-winner Hilary Swank.

Based on a 1967 novel by the same name, “Logan’s Run” chronicles a future society which imposes a mandatory death sentence for all those turning 30 in order to avoid overpopulation and the depletion of natural resources.

The film won an Academy Award for its visual effects and was nominated for two other Oscars.

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Bible thumping, gun toting Christians as terrorists?

by Family Research Council

April 4, 2007

In a scene that could have been written by Rosie O’Donnell a school in Vermont ran a terrorist simulation that strikes me as a little out of sync with reality:

Investigators described them (the psuedo-terrorists) as members of a right-wing fundamentalist group called the New Crusaders who don’t believe in separation of church and state. The mock gunmen went to the school seeking justice because the daughter of one had been expelled for praying before class.”

Yes that makes sense, Christians as terrorists. God forbid (oops there is that phrase) they should instead have the terrorists portrayed by religious fanatics that actually have a basis in reality (say a group that would fly planes of innocent civilians into a building full of innocent civilians) and not in TV shows.

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Can’t Buy Me Votes

by Tony Perkins

April 4, 2007

In the race for the future occupancy of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue (it’s one house at least whose market price is up), the media is atwitter about the amount of campaign cash the candidates have raked in to date. Several pundits have predicted that this will be “the most expensive campaign in history.” Yet few analysts seem to understand that money is not the ultimate measure of success. If it were, then Ross Perot and Steve Forbes would be counted among the former Commanders-in-Chief.

While these hopefuls seem adept at raising dollars, they have yet to raise the interest of voters to the point of congealing around their candidacy. Wayne Berman, a Washington lobbyist, argues in The Washington Post that large fundraising “is hugely important if you have to prove you are a credible candidate.” While money is no doubt extremely important, without a message you’re nothing more than an ATM for political consultants. Proving that you are a credible candidate with a sound vision for America should come first and fundraising will naturally follow. As pollster Kellyanne Conway suggests, “Excitement begets money.”

As it stands, values voters have yet to get excited. Obviously, the candidates have several months to develop their platforms, but we await the second quarter results in which the frontrunners are defined not by cash—but by conviction.

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London’s Bridges to Islam Falling Down

by Tony Perkins

April 4, 2007

Saint George may have slain the dragon, but it’s becoming painfully obvious that even he cannot conquer Great Britain’s wave of political correctness. As the country copes with an influx of Muslims, the church and government are finding it extremely difficult to maintain their British identity. As an example, the Church of England is considering removing the cross of St. George from its flag because of its association with the medieval crusades. The debate has enraged citizens who are concerned that the country may soon become unrecognizable in its pursuit of cultural pluralism.

This week, British papers are also reporting a growing problem with the public school curriculum. For fear of “offending” Muslim students, teachers have become increasingly hesitant to teach history lessons on the Holocaust because of the students’ predominantly anti-Semitic feelings. A government study found that educators are also afraid to tackle the 11th century crusades, in which Christians fought Islam for control of the Holy Land, or the Arab-Israeli conflict. Since the curriculum often conflicts with what some children are taught at the local mosques, some teachers are dropping the lessons altogether.

Sadly, it reflects the international trend to use history as a means, not for teaching the truth but promoting a value-free form of tolerance. As Chris McGovern, a government advisor, said, “Children must have access to knowledge of these controversial subjects, whether palatable or unpalatable.” Until Britons rise up to defend the traditions that they hold dear, these P.C. policies will only facilitate their nation’s decline. Americans should take notice!

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Time to Toot ACF’s Horn

by Tony Perkins

April 4, 2007

Since his unanimous confirmation by the U.S. Senate in 2001, Dr. Wade Horn has served admirably as the Assistant Secretary of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the Department of Health and Human Services. As he announces his departure, we commend him for his unwavering commitment to the intact family and abstinence.

Under his watch, ACF has promoted positive, life-changing programs for adolescents, parents, and married couples, including several new partnerships with faith-based organizations and abstinence educators. His principled leadership will be sorely missed. As the administration considers a replacement to fill the big shoes that Wade is leaving behind, we urge the White House to select a person who shares his commitment for putting the family first.

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