FRC Blog

Maybe she needs to read her Bible?

by Family Research Council

January 8, 2007

Atheist leader admits misinformation

Council’s curriculum on Bible study was not deemed unconstitutional in 4 states, director says.

Valerie Olander / The Detroit News

HOWELL — The leader of an atheists’ group opposing a proposal to bring a Bible study curriculum into Howell schools acknowledged Friday that she spread misinformation about the legality of the plan.

The leader, whose legal name is Arlene-Marie, state director of the Michigan Atheists, said she erred when she claimed in a letter to Howell schools that the curriculum of the National Council on Bible Curriculum in Public Schools had been found to be unconstitutional in four states. The council’s curriculum has never been found to be unconstitutional.

I misspoke. I should have been more careful,” Arlene-Marie said.

The admission comes as the Howell Board of Education is to discuss using a course designed by the council as an elective. It would focus on the Bible as literature and from an historical perspective. The board meets at 7 p.m. Monday at Latson Elementary School. “We have never received one complaint from one school district in our 13 years,” said Elizabeth Ridenour, president and founder of the National Council on Bible Curriculum in Greensboro, N.C.“We don’t pick the districts that want the curriculum, they come to us.” She said the Bible course curriculum has been voted into 373 school districts in 37 states, including Michigan.

I guess as an atheist she wasnt familiar with the 8th Commandment or Proverbs 25:18: A man that beareth false witness against his neighbor is a maul, and a sword, and a sharp arrow.

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News of the Duh

by Family Research Council

January 8, 2007

Do we really need taxpayer funding to find out if you dont eat you become hungry?

Study: Brain triggers hunger during fasts

NEW HAVEN, Conn., Jan. 4 (UPI) — A series of events in the human brain apparently stimulate hunger during periods of fasting, researchers at the Yale University School of Medicine said.

The study, published in the January issue of Cell Metabolism, found the events in the brain make sure a person stays hungry when food is scarce, HealthDay News said. Researchers said thyroid hormone in the brain is linked to increases in the protein UCP2, setting off a chain reaction that ultimately boosts the neurons that drive hunger.

The researchers studied mice on a 24-hour fast. Researchers found there was an increase in the enzyme that stimulates thyroid hormone production in concert with increased UCP2 protein activity.

The study examined the protein and its effects on the activity of neurons, lead researcher Sabrinia Diano said. “It’s how neurons ‘learn’ that food is missing and it keeps them ready to eat when food is introduced.”

Copyright 2007 by United Press International. All Rights Reserved.

*Have I mentioned I really hate this new format?

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This Day in History/Quote of the Day

by Family Research Council

January 6, 2007

On this day in 1643 was the first record of a legal divorce in the American colonies, Anne Clarke of the Massachusetts Bay Colony (any surprise the first destructive element against marriage in the States originated in Massachusetts?) is granted a divorce from her absent and adulterous husband, Denis Clarke, by the Quarter Court of Boston, Massachusetts. In a signed and sealed affidavit presented to John Winthrop Jr., the son of the colony’s founder, Denis Clarke admitted to abandoning his wife, with whom he had two children, for another woman, with whom he had another two children. He also stated his refusal to return to his original wife, thus giving the Puritan court no option but to punish Clarke and grant a divorce to his wife, Anne. The Quarter Court’s final decision read: “Anne Clarke, beeing deserted by Denis Clarke hir husband, and hee refusing to accompany with hir, she is graunted to bee divorced.”

QoD: “A colleague of mine once noted, there is very little difference between men and women. But, VIVE LE DIFFERENCE!!” Warner Brothers romantic skunk, Pepe le Pew, who debuted today in 1945 in the cartoon short Odor-able Kitty.

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Infant Car Seats Flunk Crash Tests

by Family Research Council

January 5, 2007

A new study by Consumer Reports finds that most of the infant car seats tested “failed disastrously” in crashes at speeds as low as 35 mph. To be sold in the United States, an infant seat must perform adequately in tests performed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. In response to the report, NHTSA Administrator Nicole Nason issued a statement saying:

We are always interested in making car seats better and safer but not more complicated and difficult for parents. … We don’t want consumers misled into thinking holding a child is better than putting it into a car seat.”

Cmon, Ms. Nason, lets be real. What sort of dumb parent would you have to be to find a car seat too complicated and difficult? And who would be so reckless that they would hold a child instead of putting them into a car seat? No parent is that incompetent.

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Quote of the Day

by Family Research Council

January 5, 2007

The haters… and negative nabobs…the people who spoke against [Rep. William Jefferson] couldn’t prevail against the people who spoke for him.”

Dr. Michael Eric Dyson, master of ceremonies for the Congressional Black Caucus’s celebratory event. The FBI is currently conducting an investigation that alleges Jefferson accepted $100,000 from a telecommunications businessman ($90,000 of which was later recovered in the congressman’s freezer). The caucus members—part of the “most ethical congress ever”—gave Jefferson a standing ovation.

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The Nancy Coefficient and Income Inequality

by Family Research Council

January 5, 2007

During the elections, Democrats warned about the increasing inequality in incomes. But a statistical test performed by the Census Bureau yesterday confirms that no statistically significant change in the inequality measure occurred between 2001 and 2005, the last year for which data are available.

The Census Bureau relied on the Gini coefficient, a standard gauge of income inequality, to make the determination. Perhaps they should use the Nancy coefficient the salary for the Speaker of the House ($215,700) is 4.7 times more than the median household income ($46,326).

Now thats income inequality.

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Ethnic Cleansing…in Louisiana?

by Family Research Council

January 5, 2007

Congressman Barney Frank (D-MA) says that President Bush’s policy toward Katrina victims represents a policy of “ethnic cleansing by inaction.”


And, what I believe is, at this point youre not talking about [inaudible], but what youre talking about is, I think, a [inaudible], what youre talking about is when you simply, in a calculated way, refuse to do anything for well over a year … [inaudible] … and [stuttering] I, I, the policy I think here is ethnic cleansing by inaction.

Its not ethnic cleansing in the sense that theyre killing people or [driving] people out, but what we need to recognize here is that, theyre in this happy position for them, where the federal government does nothing, as they become richer and richer, because well not only black people needed housing assistance,…”

Transcript by SevenStripes.com.

Related: Michelle Malkin finds that Frank stands by his claim.

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This Day in History/Quote of the Day

by Family Research Council

January 4, 2007

On this day in 1896 Utah is admitted into the Union as the 45th state. In 1846 Joseph Smith’s successor as the head of the Mormon Church, Brigham Young, led an exodus of persecuted Mormons from Nauvoo, Illinois, along the western wagon trails in search of religious and political freedom. In July 1847, the 148 initial Mormon pioneers reached Utah’s Valley of the Great Salt Lake. The pioneers then began preparations for the tens of thousands of Mormon migrants who would follow. In 1850, President Millard Fillmore named Young the first governor of the territory of Utah, and the territory enjoyed relative autonomy for several years. Relations became strained, however, when reports reached Washington that Mormon leaders were disregarding federal law and had publicly sanctioned the practice of polygamy. In 1857, President James Buchanan removed Young, a polygamist with over 20 wives, from his position as governor, and sent U.S. army troops to Utah to establish federal authority. Tensions between the territory of Utah and the federal government continued until Wilford Woodruff, the president of the Mormon Church, issued his Manifesto in 1890, renouncing the traditional practice of polygamy, and reducing the domination of the church over Utah communities. Six years later, the territory of Utah was granted statehood.

QoD: I’m not a natural leader. I’m too intellectual; I’m too abstract; I think too much. The humble Newt Gingrich. On this day in 1995 The 104th Congress becomes the first held entirely under Republican control since the Eisenhower era. Thanks in large part to Newt Gingrich and the corruption that permeated Congress in the previous Congress. You getting a feeling of Deja vu gone horribly wrong?

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This Day in History/Quote of the Day

by Family Research Council

December 29, 2006

On this day in 1908 Otto Zachow and William Besserdich of Clintonville, Wisconsin, received a patent for their four-wheel braking system, the prototype of all modern braking systems. You can read more from this link to a Fedruary 28, 1938 Time magazine.

QoD: I’d like to get away from earth awhile: And then come back to it and begin over.

May no fate willfully misunderstand me: And half grant what I wish and snatch me away:

Not to return. Earth’s the right place for love: I don’t know where it’s likely to go better.

I’d like to go by climbing a birch tree~And climb black branches up a snow-white trunk

Toward heaven, till the tree could bear no more, But dipped its top and set me down again. That would be good both going and coming back. One could do worse than be a swinger of birches. Robert Frost, Birches.

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Four links a-linking

by Jared Bridges

December 28, 2006

For those of you still reading the internet on this fourth day of Christmas, here are four links (plus a bonus):

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