FRC Blog

More from Honduras

by Tony Perkins

April 9, 2009

Yesterday was a rainy day, but a very productive day! We received a warm reception from the local officials in Tela this morning as we inquired into the local government process that we would have to go through in order to construct an orphanage. I’ll be honest; I was prepared for a more “involved” process that might require campaign contributions - but that didn’t happen. They seemed to be genuinely appreciative of our humanitarian efforts to address what they recognize as a very serious problem - children with no parents.

While officials in Tela have certain jurisdiction over Tornabe, the Garifuna who live in the village operate with a lot of autonomy. In fact, from what we gathered the Garifuna refused to recognize the outside government, at least when it comes to paying taxes.

Ray, a friend in a local church that my home church helped establish here, also operates a taxi, so he drove us around. While it is not more than seven or eight miles to Tornabe (on the Caribbean), the condition of the roads and paths-along with the stray animals-make the trip somewhat of an adventure. In fact, at one point near the village, the taxi got stuck in the sand on the road and we had get out and push.

When we arrived, Pastor Marvin, the pastor of the local evangelical church was out picking up food for the orphanage. We had not spoken to him since we were in the village last summer and he was not expecting us. We had not been able to communicate with him regarding our desire to work in his local community until today. When we shared with him what we would like to do his eyes began to tear up and he said “glory.” He then told us they had taken the first steps toward establishing an orphanage but did not have the resources and had been praying that God would some how intervene on behalf of these children give them the ability to feed them three meals a day and provide a safe place for them to live.

After looking at what they have already started the process will go much quicker than we had originally thought. In July we planned to return to complete a kitchen, dining area, and a small sleeping area. Plans will then be made for a much larger dormitory divided into two areas: one for boys and one for girls.

It is certainly rewarding to serve the “least of these” who have been orphaned by parents who died of AIDS, but as we walked and drove through the village, seeing the children run in the midst of the trash that was strewn throughout, I was reminded of why we do what we do at FRC. Deny as we might, there are consequences for a community or a country that rejects the proper nature of human sexuality within the context of marriage. Unfortunately, far too often it is children who pay the price for the “sexual liberties” of adults.

Continue reading

Who are you going to Believe, Me or your own Eyes?

by Robert Morrison

April 9, 2009

An unnamed White House aide has tried to stifle criticism of the President for his deep and low bow before Saudi King Abdullah at the recently concluded G-20 summit in London. That anonymous fellow seems to giving us Groucho Marx’s line: “Who are you going to believe, me or your own eyes?” The aide claims that the tall President was merely taking both hands of the diminutive desert monarch in his and had to bend down.

That set off another round of Internet speculation. Queen Elizabeth II is also much shorter than the President, and you can see him giving a short, sharp bow of the head to her. The point of our previous criticism is not that Barack Obama showed greater deference to the king of a despotic regime that persecutes Christians while slighting the Head of State of our leading ally, Britain. The point was simple: Americans do not bow to anyone.

 

Continue reading

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

April 9, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

Continue reading

Notes from Honduras: Vol. 1

by Tony Perkins

April 8, 2009

We arrived in Honduras last night on our trip to make preparations to build an orphanage for children whose parents have died from AIDS.  On our medical mission trip this past summer we went to a village outside of Tela, called Tornabe, and discovered homeless children everywhere. The reason, we found out, was that Tornabe has the highest rate of AIDS infection in the Western Hemisphere.  These children sleep on the beach, the streets, or — if they are lucky — the house of a friend where they are safe.  We are working with a church in the village to host the facility.

Our arrival last night was delayed a few hours after a passenger in Miami made a threat and was removed from the plane — along with his luggage and mine! I am told it will be here this afternoon.

This morning our plan is to meet with local governmental officials to make sure there are no unforeseen obstacles that could pop up in the process of building the orphanage.

Continue reading

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

April 7, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

Continue reading

Having the Experience, Missing the Meaning

by Family Research Council

April 7, 2009

Talk show host and author Tavis Smiley has written a new book called Accountable, which attempts to navigate the difficult waters swirling around the success or failure of Obama’s presidency. Smiley, who is African American, is quoted in the Washington Post today as saying that if Obama fails, “it may be another 400 years before we get another African-American president.” Smiley is at the center of a raging debate among African-American leaders about the limits of tough questioning of the new president and his policies, a debate in which Smiley has been in the minority as an advocate for treating Obama as a man and not merely a milestone. Smiley is on the right side of this debate, in my view, but his apocalyptic opinion that Obama holds the fortunes of African-American politicians in his hands only feeds into the mantra of those who regard Obama as an untouchable symbol. A failure of Obama’s policies would and should damage only those policies - massive expansion of government, nationalization of various parts of the U.S. industrial sector, international naivete, and radical social liberalism - but that failure should merely pave the way for the election of someone of opposing views. There are a number of conservative African Americans of stature who have that resume, and the country could well elect one of them president before 4 — and not 400 — years have passed.

Continue reading

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

April 6, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

Continue reading

A Letter to Notre Dame

by Michael Leaser

April 6, 2009

From a Catholic physician and Notre Dame alumnus:

Dear Father Jenkins,

What a shocking abdication of moral principles you and the university have displayed by honoring Barack Obama. How can such an enemy of life be given a platform at Notre Dame? This is a man whose avowed mission is to force abortion and contraception services on Catholic hospitals. He has unwaveringly supported late term abortions, for any reason, as well as the disgusting partial birth abortion procedure. He repeatedly voted against resuscitation efforts for babies who survived botched abortions. As a Catholic physician, I am appalled at the life destroying policies he has already enabled with the stroke of his pen.

No amount of sophistry or spin can justify his evil actions nor the actions of a Catholic school which gives tacit approval and support to such scandalous behavior. What a propaganda coup for the anti-life forces of evil! This is a scandal that gives cover and rationalization to Planned Parenthood, the Nancy Pelosi types, and to organizations like the anti-life Catholics for Choice. Do you not realize that you are being used, that Obama has suckered you into tacit approval of his virulent anti-life message?

When grave moral error has been committed, as in this situation, you must do everything you can to correct it and prevent the evil consequences of such an act. I urge you to cancel this invitation and rectify this ill-conceived travesty.

Sadly,

Joseph Leaser, M.D. ‘54

Continue reading

Archives