[Note: On June 17, Rob Boston of Americans United for Separation of Church and State posted an item on their blog criticizing Family Research Council for ads that we ran in several California newspapers for Father's Day. Below is a response.]

Dear Rob,

I read your June 17 blog post in which you said, "I challenge the FRC and other Religious Right groups to come up with one good secular reason against same-sex marriage. I don't think they can do it."

Perhaps you just haven't been paying attention. I am sending you a complimentary copy of my book, Outrage: How Gay Activists and Liberal Judges Are Trashing Democracy to Redefine Marriage (Washington: Regnery, 2004-also available online). You can ignore Chapter 8 if you like, since it offers nine pages of religious arguments. Concentrate instead on Chapters 1-7, which offer 107 pages of secular arguments against same-sex marriage.

If that's too much for you, you can read my paper "Questions and Answers; What's Wrong with Letting Same-Sex Couples 'Marry'?" It's 16 pages, and 100% secular.

You might also want to read our paper titled "Ten Arguments from Social Science against Same-Sex 'Marriage.'" (I can't take credit for that one). All ten of the arguments are secular.

If even that 6-page paper is too long for you, take a look at my very short piece that answers the perennial question "What Harm Would Same-Sex 'Marriage' Do?" It describes (briefly) eight specific harms to society that would likely result from same-sex marriage. In the interest of full disclosure, I should note that this publication was originally produced as an issue-oriented "tract" in cooperation with the American Tract Society. However, the eight arguments are all secular (the American Tract Society had to request that we tack on a Scripture verse at the end in order to give it a religious flavor).

Finally, let me recommend to you David Blankenhorn's book The Future of Marriage (New York: Encounter Books, 2007). Blankenhorn hardly qualifies as a member of the "Religious Right," since he explicitly rejects the biblical teaching on the immorality of homosexual conduct. However, he argues vigorously against same-sex marriage in 261 pages of 100% secular arguments. My review of his book is on our website.

One final note-in your challenge you say, "And don't try to give me that 'marriage-is-about-raising-children' line." This comment is roughly equivalent to me challenging the advocates of same-sex marriage-but then adding, "And don't try to give me that 'equal-rights-under-law' line." If you want to have a serious debate, you have an obligation to interact seriously with your opponent's chief argument-in this case, with the overwhelming historical and anthropological evidence that links marriage with procreation.

Here's how Blankenhorn responds to what we might call "that 'marriage-is-not-about-procreation' line:"

By the way, did you know that cars are not intrinsically connected to driving? When you acquire ownership of a car, society does not impose on you a binding obligation to drive it. If you buy a car but fail to drive it, the state does not for that reason revoke your driver's license or refuse to grant you one, or take your car away. If you do not drive, but do collect antique cars, there is nothing wrong or illegal about it. Cars can be about many things, including pleasure, aesthetics, economic gain, and social status. Driving is therefore not fundamental to cars.

. . . This way of arguing is clearly preposterous. That it is widely employed by prominent journalists, eminent judges, and tenured professors does not make it any less preposterous. We can either think like analysts looking at a social institution, or think like lawyers looking for a loophole. The evidence . . . shows overwhelmingly-I believe beyond any reasonable doubt-that marriage as a human institution is intrinsically connected to bearing and raising children. To argue otherwise is to argue like a lawyer looking for a loophole; it is not intellectually or morally serious, at least insofar as we actually care about the institution we are discussing (The Future of Marriage, pp. 152-153).

Rob, whether you find these arguments "good" or "solid" is a matter of opinion. But please don't accuse us again of failing to offer secular reasons to oppose same-sex marriage.

Sincerely,

Peter Sprigg

Vice President for Policy

Family Research Council

Washington, DC