Last week, the Associated Press reported the story that a Yale University art student over a nine-month period had artificially inseminated herself, self-induced repeated abortions and saved the blood to showcase in her senior performance art project.

In the media blitz that followed, it was soon revealed that the student had feigned both the pregnancies and miscarriages. The entire project is an art piece, a creative fiction designed to draw attention to the ambiguity surrounding form and function of a womans body, said Helaine Klasky, a university spokeswoman.

Yale officials went on to issue the following statement, “Had these acts been real, they would have violated basic ethical standards and raised serious mental and physical health concerns.”

We would agree with Yale’s statement that the reported project would have “violated basic ethical standards and raised serious mental and physical health concerns.” Reflecting on the artistic interpretation of the project though, one could view this student’s purported experiments with her body for her art as “choice” to the nth degree. The pro-abortion movement would like for women to have the complete “freedom” to do what they would like with their bodies for their own individual purposes, regardless of the harms it may cause to them or others. In an effort to avoid pregnancy, anything goes including repeated drug-induced abortions or miscarriages with poorly regulated drugs which can disrupt women’s regular cycles, and disregard for resultant physical and psychological consequences.

In the end, it was not so much the ambiguity surrounding form and function of a womans body that was highlighted, but rather clarity that the project operated within a vacuum of a misplaced notion of both freedom and true choice; devoid of care for the woman, the bond between a mother and her child, and the miracle of the beginning of life.